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Writing a Killer Proposal

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On Guru.com, you’ll find literally thousands of work opportunities at your fingertips. To turn these opportunities into paying jobs, you’ll need to do more than send canned proposals to Employers.

Submit customized, attention-grabbing proposals

Though Employers certainly consider your resume, earnings, and feedback when deciding whether to hire you, your proposal will convince Employers that you are the right person or company for the job.

Employers will know, and will not appreciate, if you send them a canned proposal. Improve your chances of being hired by thoughtfully tailoring each proposal to the project.

Structure your proposal around these five major points.

  • Introduction
  • Plan of Action
  • Skills and Experience
  • Pricing and Time Estimates
  • Closing  


Introduction
In a brief opening paragraph, state the project title and Project ID and thank the Employer for the opportunity, or briefly outline the rest of the proposal.

Plan of Action

This part really sells your pitch. Employers are less interested in your past projects than they are in hearing what you can bring to their current project. Offer a concrete series of steps and ideas on how to execute the work. Demonstrate your ability to plan efficiently.

Skills and Experience
Build this section around a few unique advantages that only you can bring to the Employer’s project. Highlight the skills and experiences that make you the ideal candidate for the job.

Pricing and Time Estimates
If you’ve written a strong proposal, the Employer knows that you’re a talented, capable Freelancer, and wants to hire you, so lay out the nuts and bolts: When will the project be done, and how much will it cost? If you’re willing to negotiate, let the Employer know.

Closing
Reiterate your interest in the project and thank the Employer for taking the time to consider your proposal. Feel free to provide your website address and additional contact information, such as your phone number, a chat ID, etc.

The Employer is receiving many proposals, and may not want to read another lengthy pitch. By keeping your proposal concise and topical, you are more likely to ensure that the Employer will read to the end.

If the Employer has asked specific questions in the project posting, be sure to address them. These questions are key points that the Employer needs answered; if you neglect them, you paint yourself as lazy or uncooperative.

If you are a Guru or Guru Vendor member, you can grab an Employer’s attention before they even read one word of your proposal by having it featured as a Premium proposal.

Finally, check and check again to make sure that your document is free of spelling and grammatical errors. The way you present yourself through your writing is indicative of the way you will approach a project. Establish yourself as thoughtful and detail-oriented, not hasty and careless.

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